Labrabull (Pitador), The Labrador Retriever and American Pit Bull Terrier Mix

We hope you love the products we recommend! Just so you know, SpockTheDog may collect a share of sales or other compensation from the links on this page.

Labrabull-Dog-InformationThe Labrabull, which is also known as a Pitador, is a mixed dog, a combination between parents of two different breeds, in this case between a Labrador Retriever and an American Pit Bull Terrier. Mixed dogs are characterized by their uniqueness, due to the combination of physical characteristics, temperament, health issues and intelligence which comes from two different breeds. When you’re getting a Labrabull (or Pitador if you prefer the name), you’re never really sure what you’re getting. You can get a general idea of their physical appearance, since even as puppies they might display signs of being closer to one breed or another, but as far as health goes and even their temperament, those can be unknown quantities at this point.

Because the genetic legacy of both parents will influence the Labrabull in one way or another, we’ll cover below the characteristics of both sides, specifically where they are similar and where they differ.

Labrabull (Pitador) Recommended Products

Taste of the Wild Dry Dog Food
Custom Embroidered Dog Collar (daily use)
Dog Training Collar (training use)
TaoTronics Retractable Dog Leash, 16 ft & Dog Waste Bags
PetFusion Ultimate Pet Bed & Lounge
Dog Treats - Cow Ears All Natural 12 Pack
2-in-1 Combo Brush
Dog Flea & Tick Treatment (free 1-2 day shipping over $49)
These are products that you could need for your new Labrabull (Pitador), or for other medium to large dogs in general. These are all high quality and recommended by those that bought them in the past.

The Labrabull Appearance and Behavior

The Labrabull’s size will vary in height between 12 and 27 inches, with a weight between 30 and 115 pounds. These are the extremes of the two breeds, so chances are that the dog will be somewhere in the middle. Both breeds have a short coat, which sheds moderately and doesn’t require a lot of grooming from the owner. The Pit Bull is not much of a barker, but the Labrador does have a bit of a tendency to do it, so your new Pitador might or might not enjoy barking a lot while you’re sleeping.

As far as friendliness goes, the Labrador is well known for his love for all strangers, but the Pit Bull is a bit more reserved, though still friendly overall. The Labrador doesn’t need to be the dominant one, but the Pit Bull on the other hand is quite dominant, and needs training in this regard while he’s still a puppy. Both breeds are easily trainable, with a bonus in this area for the Labrador, which is a pleasure to work with.

Both breeds can be raised in apartments, as long as they get plenty of exercise. Either way, if they’re kept indoors, you can expect them to be active. In both cases, the Labrabull should do well with kids, especially if he takes from the Labrador side of the gene pool more. As far as other pets go, the Labrador side might do OK with them, but if he inherits from the Pit Bull, you can expect a lot of aggressiveness towards other dogs of same sex, and towards other types of pets. If you do own other dogs or cats, a Labrabull mix might not be a good idea, at least if it’s an unknown quantity as far as temperament is concerned.

Both breeds can do well in areas like agility or competitive obedience, and they should enjoy activities like hunting and tracking (retrieving as well for the Labrador). They can be watchdogs as well.

Pitador Puppies

Labrabull-Pitador-PuppyWhen looking at puppies that are mixed between an American Pit Bull Terrier and a Labrador Retriever, you can already see some of the characteristics that will dictate how the dog will look like as an adult. You might also see the playfulness of the Labrador, or the dominance of the Pit Bull.

The Labrabull puppy should begin training at a fairly young age, especially when it comes to his issues of dominance and obedience. The puppy should be fed with appropriate food and if it’s not super premium kibble, the diet should be supplemented with vitamins and calcium, according to the vet’s advice.

Pictures of Labrabulls

Here’s a picture of a black Labrabull, a good looking dog for sure.

Black-Pitador-Mix

And here’s another picture of a Pitador mixed dog.

Pitador-Mixed-Dog-Labrador-Pit-Bull

And here is a video with a Labrabull dog, if you want to see one moving around.

Labrabull Images

Labrabull

Labrabull-1

Labrabull-3

Labrabull-4

Labrabull-5

Labrabull-6

General Information on  Labrador/Pitbull Mixes

Labrabulls are very nice dogs, having the fur colored in black, white, brown or yellow. Usually, their coat is very dense and short. Due to their fine undercoat, this breed isn’t able to resist to cold weather conditions.

If you are willing to become an owner of this beautiful breed of dog, you need to know it requires firmness from you and, most important of all, you have to be a very good leader in front of him.

As for their personality, Labrabulls need to feel like they belong to a pack, knowing that you are the leader of this pack. Because, if it doesn’t, it will be really hard for you to manage the situation.

It’s an excellent pet for your children, especially they are very protective and cute. They are, also, very intelligent dogs and can socialize very well in a family. If you want this dog for your child, you should know it’s very athletic and loves all kind of activities, and most of all, it is very friendly. However, it will not permit stangers to enter his territory.

To not get bored and consume its energy, The Labrabull needs a lot of exercises and a very stimulating schedule. Otherwise, it may have a very destructive behavior and use its energy the wrong way.

They are very obedient dogs, taking commands only from their masters, no matter if a new person comes in.

As for its coat, The Labrabull has a nice fur coat, very easily to keep it clean and dry. All you have to do is to brush it no more than once a week, this way helping it to get rid of dead hair and maintain the fur coat very clean and shining.

It’s not recommended to bath your dog too often and, when you do this, you need to use a dry shampoo because it’s best for its coat.

If we talk about a dog having a natural aggressive behaviour, then it necessarily needs socializing and a lots of training. This training’s main goal is to teach the dog to be obedient to an owner.

It’s not acceptable for a dog to jump on people, that’s why it needs to be reined in.

As to positive reactions of the dog, when you see something like that you need to know your dog should be rewarded immediately with praises and different treats. Labrabulls are great playing partners for your kids, as long as they grew up being surrounded by children.

Labrabulls love doing outdoor activities, that’s why we highly recommend you should walk your dog or just as well you could let your dog run free.

They are very devoted dogs, so there’s very little chances to have them running away from home. However, you need a leash for when another animal is present.

For those of you wanting to register your pet, there are some organizations dealing with this problem. It isn’t a requirement, but it might be an interesting idea especially if you are going to use the pet for breeding.

Comments

comments

56 thoughts on “Labrabull (Pitador), The Labrador Retriever and American Pit Bull Terrier Mix”

  1. “but if he inherits from the Pit Bull, you can expect a lot of aggressiveness towards other dogs of same sex, and towards other types of pets. If you do own other dogs or cats, a Labrabull mix might not be a good idea, at least if it’s an unknown quantity as far as temperament is concerned.” This is just not true. Most Pits if well trained and well socialized DO NOT have dog aggressiveness. As terriers they can be dominant and bossy but it is up to us to work with them. This just perpetuates a stereotype and is not good information.

    Reply
    • I agree. We have a lab and pit mix that is just over a year old here at my house because it is my daughter’s and she, unfortunately, moved back in. Anyhow, he gets along great with the cat, the beagle, and the chihuahua that are here. He is just so much bigger than all the other animals that he clumsily plays with them. He and the chihuahua play the best. The beagles doesn’t like to be bothered by him. Anyhow…thought I would share.

      Reply
      • Same here, I have a 1.5 year old lab/pit bull i inherited from my son, who is now off to college. We also have a 3 year old shorty jack russell terrier, they get along fine, but the lab/pit bull likes to play and he is so much bigger then the jack russell. He doesn’t show any aggression, but he can be very intimidating with his looks and size. We have introduced him into a doggy daycare and hope this will condition him. We also walk him every day and spend lots of time with him. He does have a lot of energy, but the walking seems to calm him down.

        Reply
    • So I’m kinda nervous for my dog to be around other dogs. I’ve seen her have defend herself and not sure how she would react. We just moved to a house and there are dogs all round us in our back yard. She seems to want to fight them. But, did wonderful with my friends Yorky . Should I take her to a dog park

      Reply
      • I rescued a abandoned dog and did not know what she was until I google lab/pit because my friend said that.. And that’s what she is. We have to keep her separated from my 7 year old Labradoodle! But she loves me! She will not leave my side she sleeps with me! The little neighborhood girls walk her and she is fine with that I love her and would like to keep her but I can’t because of her aggression toward Chino. I posted her on a website before I knew what she was. Now I know she will have to go to a one owner! I don’t know how old she is but she is at least 3.

        Reply
    • Agreed. There is so much misinformation in this article. My lab/pit mix is the farthest thing from dominant possible. She is so submissive towards other dogs, on a walk when she sees another dog coming, she will lay down on the ground and wait for them to come to her, roll over and let them smell her. Now if we’re talking about with licking another dogs face like crazy? Then yes, I suppose she’s dominant. I hate when people generalize dog breeds. It’s all about the human owner, training, and just plain individuality. Just like humans of the same race- they may have the same skin tone, be from the same country, but that doesn’t mean they are like each other!!

      Reply
  2. Iw, I do believe you are right about Pits, they can be wonderful dogs and there is a lot of bad information about them out there. As you mentioned, IF they are given the proper amount of attention and training, they will be great dogs. That good training is not guaranteed though, and most people will not be capable of offering it. I believe it’s a good idea to tell people that a breed needs more attention, before they get that dog. We’re not talking about how dogs behave if they are trained well, we’re talking about their natural behavior/instinct.

    I don’t claim to be right about everything though, so if you have direct experience with Pit Bull dogs, please feel free to share in the comments (or do a guest post on the blog about this breed). I’d be happy to hear from a pit bull owner.

    Reply
    • I was the vice president of the APBA FOR 6 YEARS I never fought a dog in a ring (pit) so therefore my dog isn’t a pt-bull, she’s a labrabull. Sweetest friend you ever had. Don’t break into my house and be aggressive though. LOL

      Reply
  3. My family and I adopted a 1 yr old Labrabull from our local SPCA. (Actually, he picked us. Leapt up on my shoulders and pinned me to the wall with big sloppy puppy kisses. Absolutely had to take him home. ^_^)

    Marley had been severely abused and still holds the scars from his horrible experience. His previous owners tied him up in an unsheltered backyard and moved away. The rescuers found him near death.
    At the time, my husband and I had a 2 yr old daughter and a 4 yr old son. Marley became a predominate house dog (going outside to play and do his business). We thought it important he be introduced as part of the family especially because of what he had been through. Of course, I was a stay at home mother and there to help Marley every step of the way.

    Marley is almost 7 yrs old now and we have another addition to our family.

    Never once have we had a problem with our Pupzilla. He adores the kids, has suffered all kinds of friendly children attention, and crying.
    However, (and I don’t know if it’s because he’s very protective of his family or because of his abuse)he doesn’t suffer other animals around us. He will play with other neighborhood dogs just fine, but if they come in the yard, all bets are off.(Puppies are not included in this. He’s actually very fond of baby anything.)

    I think pit bulls and this particular breed have an unfounded personality stigma. By all stereotypical standards, Marley should have been aggressive and temperamental. He’s not. He’s easy going and so loving, always wagging his tail and soaking up attention. Still hates taking a bath though. LOL

    I agree with lw and Alex. It takes a tremendous amount of time, effort, and love to raise any animal. A larger breed and those with Marley’s background need extra attention. Mostly because they don’t know their own strength sometimes and Marley was very unsure, never aggressive, just would run behind my legs when the kids got too rowdy. After several months of constantly working with him, the kids and the dog ran through the house chasing one another as a close knit group. Now, they’re inseparable. He tries to follow them onto the school bus.

    To be honest, I never considered Marley’s pit bull lineage to be a factor. He clearly has the features and is massive at 95 lbs, but is misunderstood. As far as people are concerned, he’s never met a stranger. He loves to meet new people, is a favorite at the vet, and if you rub his belly he’s your friend for life. In fact, I tell my husband if we were ever robbed, Marley would probably let them walk right on out of our house with everything we owned as long as he got attention. ^_^

    I don’t believe it’s the dogs or breed that cause the ill-tempers, its the owners. A dog starved for affection or in need of guidance will test boundaries and sometimes those can go to the extremes depending on the circumstance. Any living thing is a great responsibility and it’s not for everyone. Neglect in several regards is unfortunately common. Feeding them and petting them is just not enough. It’s a commitment and a life changing one.

    Marley is a testament to all neigh-sayers out there, give them enough love and attention and show them how much you truly care and you will have the best dog in the world.

    Reply
    • Our 7 year old Jasmine is veey similar to yours. We have had someone break in and she let them take whatever they wanted. As long as she has met you once and your gave her attention that is all that is needed. Now if the kids are outside and she is in her lead and you walk bbc.co in the yard and she dont know you she will tey to attack you. Shea great with puppies and our Chihuahua but we have tried ti have other dogs and as soon as they get bigger than the Chihuahua she starts getting veey aggressive with them. She likes other dogs to be submissive to her and if not she gets attitude. She also is a rescue. Love our pitlab. Best dog ever.

      Reply
  4. So me and my bf found a pit/lab mix, super adorable, female && the chunckyness on her make you want to eat all her cuteness up , any tips for training ? We also have a 5yr old

    Reply
    • Reyna, I have had a labrabull from the time he was a puppy. Amazing dog hands down. He is very smart but in a very dumb goofy kind of way. When I first got him I made sure to expose him to kids, babies, strangers, other types of animals and hes never once shown any type of aggression or unease. Actually it turned out very different being that he loves playing with the neighborhood kids and dogs and will sit outside and watch them and cry and cry until he gets permission to “go see” He ran away only once because he heard a kid crying at a local park which was across the street. He is a pit mix with does carry some habits that I broke early such as shaking of the head, he still does it but never learned how correctly so it just looks funny. With a lab breed it was jumping which was also broken very early, never had any problems. with both there was a little chewing up toys and whatnot but now he knows if he destroys his toys they get taken so he never does. The important thing is to be dominate but also very loving as both breeds can get feelings hurt very easy. Some good tips when training, If they chew up a toy, take it away and do not give it back and if you throw it away let them see it and show them that if they “hurt” their toys, they are gone. make sure you are very dominate, feed them after you eat, make them sit and wait, play with them constantly and teach them as many tricks you can because they will anyways try to impress you to get approval but stay consistent in any training. They can get separation anxiety very easy so I would recommend kennel training, (even if you are at home) very early if you see any signs of it (we did and he never needs it now) but try not to use it as a punishment, make it a comfort place for him. also if you see signs of SA, don’t let him sleep in bed with you, make him sit by himself if you are home and only come to you if called. When you do come home ignore him for at least 10 minutes until hes calmed down and if you do kennel train, you can leave a shirt or towel that smells like you, leave a tv on or a radio, it helps. expose him to many many different things. Never let him feel in charge. If you do treats, make sure its limited because they have a BIG appetite sometimes and instead of treats when training them, you can do a lot of loving petting and “good boys” with tons of energy behind it, it was more effective with mine but all dogs are different. stay dominate and you should be good. reward and punishment I have found has worked with every dog I have ever had. Do not let any bad behavior pass and if he does shake his head while playing i would recommend stopping it.

      Reply
      • I rescued a abandoned dog and did not know what she was until I google lab/pit because my friend said that.. And that’s what she is. We have to keep her separated from my 7 year old Labradoodle! But she loves me! She will not leave my side she sleeps with me! The little neighborhood girls walk her and she is fine with that I love her and would like to keep her but I can’t because of her aggression toward Chino. I posted her on a website before I knew what she was. Now I know she will have to go to a one owner! I don’t know how old she is but she is at least 3.

        Reply
  5. I have my second labrabull she stands 25 inches high weighs 85 pounds black/white chest and tips pf paws. I had another one about 20 years ago. My current labrabull turned out to be a scent dog and it didnt take much training it came natural for her. She can now track human scent, do area search and cadaver work and is extremely good at it. I got her at 4 months old rescued her she needed to be fixed and had a umbilical hernia also that needed to be fixed she is now 3 years old and by my side 90% of the time. I can not stress how active these dogs are, given that the breed requires a owner to spend time daily with the dog including long walks. If you don’t these dogs will be very destructive. Mine loves all animals,people and kids for some reason seem to favor girls over boys, so she is aware of genders of kids. Like any dog they require training but even more so because of the breed.

    Reply
  6. I just got a pitador and she is very hyper. She also loves attention and to get whatever she can into her mouth.but she is very affectionate and loves to please me. I would recommend this breed for a good family dog.

    Reply
  7. I have 2 female Pitador’s. The older one has strong pit bull instincts while the young one has strong lab instincts. Both have been great family dogs. They are absolutely the best dogs that I have ever had. The best part is that I got them for free as puppies.

    Reply
  8. Hi i have one labrabull 4 month pupy. And i want to know that if he will fight against daberman or german shepherd than what will happen i mean who will be the best ????

    Reply
  9. We just got a Pitador, he is 3 months old, I was playing with him and it was playful then he suddenly began barking and growling at me, I was concerned at first but after reading these comments I did the right thing. asserted dominance, and stop playing with him, was that right?

    Reply
    • Ken,
      Sounds about right. Has this happened again? I bet your pup was trying to be alpha. This could happen if you play so much he feels like your peer…show him who is boss and ensure playing with him doesn’t compromise that.

      Reply
  10. I’m planning on getting a Labrabull of my own one of these days. A friend of mine has a puppy that is just a couple of weeks old. I figure I can handle him, even if he proves to be difficult. I owned a couple of dogs before, got them trained by professionals and everything was OK. They’ve been great for me, but this would be my first mixed breed with this kind of heritage. I hope it’s going to be a good experience.

    Reply
  11. I have a 4 month old male Labrabull. He can be very sweet, loving, and a good listener. He is learning basic commands, and is doing quite well. He does, however, become aggressive toward me by jumping up and biting my hands, arms, and legs. When I push him away, he comes at me harder. He is biting me really hard. It seems like he is trying to dominate me, but it scares me. I have never had a pet bite me so hard, and am not sure what to do. I have been taking him by the collar (when he doesn’t bite me while I do so) and drag him to another room with a closed door, or in his crate. Not sure I am doing the right thing.

    Reply
    • I am going through the same issue. I adopted my Labrabull from the shelter 3 months ago and he attacks me on walks. Same exact thing. He has been to obedience school and is having constant training but will only atrack me and no one else. He is gentle and loving otherwise. At 9 months old im at a loss!

      Reply
    • No. Definently not what you should do. You must stand your ground. By any means necessary. That will make him mean and more aggressive if you can’t handle it get a trainer or a new dog.

      Reply
    • I have a 1.5 year old Labrabull and he does the same, likes to growl (when playing) and likes to bite (not aggressive, just playing) on your hand. When the growling starts, I stop playing with him and show more dominance. When he wants to bite, I grab his month and discipline by saying “no bite”. This seems to work best with him. He likes to play tug with his toys and this starts the growling, so I take away his toy and place it out of his site. Remember he is still just a puppy and habits will have to be broken. Training and attention is the best method.

      Reply
      • Should have added, you must be consistent with your commands. Using different commands when trying to achieve the same goal will confuse your dog. I stay with basic one to two word commands; sit, stay, stop, NO, etc.

        Reply
    • Grab him by the muzzle with both hands. Not enough to really hurt him but he will feel pressure. Give a command “Out” or whatever you choose. Repeat as often as needed and as soon as you get compliance praise your pet.
      These corrections must be immediate, consistent, firmly, but without injurying your pet. Pain doesn’t equal injury (as in pain compliance in martial arts). Each member if the family will need to do so when the dog bites.

      Never never tolerate biting!!!!
      When you feed your dog, reach in a remove some food. He the dog becomes aggressive/bites then correct immediately.

      Biting when disturbed eating is a complete No! Non-negotiable.

      Socialize socialize socialize but not until you have corrected the biting.

      NEVER rationalize biting or inappropriate aggression from your pet, whether against you, or any guest, child, or other home pet. Never ever.

      An assertive dog is not bad. But aggressivion, no.

      Reply
    • I had problems with my pit mix, and they went away after he was neutered and a I adopted or more positive training method. One thing I have found is don’t overreact, don’t be afraid, just treat your dog like a misbehaving puppy, firm but loving.

      Reply
  12. I have a 1 1/2 year old male labrabull “Leo” we got him at 4 weeks old due to weining problem he has been best dog I’ve owned he loves children. Very protective while on leash or in car. Except for kids always loves them. He definitely listens to me over rest of family. He does get seperation anxiety when anyone leaves home even if rest of family is there. Wonderful dog

    Reply
  13. Hi all. My wife, kids and myself have been looking for a black lad/Pit mix puppy. Preferably 3months old, black and female. We just had to put our “Molly” girl down after 14 wonderful years. We fell in love with the mixed species and would desperately love to find another, but no luck? Can anyone out there please help a lovin family replave its missing piece?

    Reply
  14. I want to get a golden retriever/pit mix now I am wondering becauace I love both breeds but when I mix them I was looking for more of the long hair from a golden then the short hair as I am kinda allergic any opinions on what I’m saying will it have the coat of the retriever or short hair sounds like the perfect dog for hunting and just family dog plus the health would be great due to the fact of pits having few issues compared to a retriever

    Reply
  15. My “son” his mother black lab and his dad red nose pit. He is very protective but very loving as well. (Also very spoiled ) Extremely intelligent. Not to fond of male dogs… cat’s, bird’s, etc. He is chocolate, white star on chest ,and rather large head. He’s a solid 75 lbs or more… looking for female to breed him. Please email me [email protected]. We reside in az

    Reply
  16. Who are you people that think pits are naturally aggressive towards other animals?
    I had a pit for 14 years with a lab and cat. All got along and all respected each other, also friends and strangers. I now have a pit=lab mix, an American Bull Dog and still
    have my 15 year old black lab & the same cat. My pit-lab mix (SCOOTER) a year old rescue is a typical puppy, but does respect our family and his pack, especially the cat.
    I hope you all have such a wonderful experience with your pits and mixes.

    Reply
  17. Oh well, i just got my first pitlab, last Saturday , i named Joaquin , he is turning 2 months this March 10t …he is so smart and learned already to be seat he can be a lil agressive sometimes but most the time is the lovely sweetest puppies ever, i love him already but i have to talk to him a lil harder sometimes bc i did read about they can be dominantes ( if you show weakness )…but he is so obedient ….Now, working on his potty outside and he is doing pretty much well he is awesome!!!! i have in home a cat and another 1 year old puddle , Joaquin likes them and love toplay with them all day.

    Reply
  18. I “love” the statement that you don’t know what temperament you get with a mix. As if you know for sure with a pure breed. Some pure Labs can be docile to the max and others holy terrors, and even, yes, “dominant,” whatever one means with that term. The article meanders from there…

    BTW, for those of you with a puppy, the difference between a dog that doesn’t like strangers and one that does, is, well, one that got to meet lots of strangers from an early age to learn that they’re cool. If you want a “guard” dog that might also bite your plumber, go ahead and keep him away from human beings. If you want a well-socialized and friendly dog, introduce him/her to as many folks as you can from an early age. The same goes with other dogs: introduce him/her to friendly pooches, and you will not get the pulling-aggressive behavior you will likely get with a dog that thinks every other canine is a threat because he’s never interacted with enough of them to know that, in fact, the majority of them (the ones that haven’t been ruined) just want to sniff and play. Finally, for goodness’ sake–don’t coup up your dog in your house and/or backyard with no outside/outdoor activity. And whatever you do, don’t tie them to a lead, no matter how long. Give your dog the freedom and the structured attention it needs. Take him/her on long daily walks, let him/her explore the world beyond your fence line, and see what a well-adjusted, relaxed dog you get.

    Reply
  19. I have a putador named Sasha she is 2 she’s so sweet and such a cuddler and does not like strangers very protective of me and my spouse and the other dogs .this is the best breed .they are very obedient and listen to me being in the alpha in the house but as to playful its a fulltime job to wear her out she can play fetch all day non stop but when uts nap time for me she’s right there to cuddle arm and paw together head to head and I love the kiss and nibble on my ear the she gets from the PitBull side and the PitBull smile to is too cute I love ? my putador! And always will! ,Stephen E Houston,TX

    Reply
  20. I have a labrabull that is 4 months old and very playful with a 3 year old grandson and wants to lick all over a one month old baby. He adores my grandson so much that he allows him to lay on him, grab his face and squeeze it. Just weighed in today at 37.8 lbs but loves to play with my sisters lab / greyhound mix and daughters 8 week old pure pit bull puppy. Neighbor has a lab mix not sure with what but he is very massive in size and my Shadow plays with him fine, only issue I have is he wants to knowl on my arm and hand when playing; never hard or break skin but I think that is the puppy in him. Anyway I don’t want him doing that and when walking he wants to pull most of the time and jump up for people to pet him, I really want those issues stopped. And I was one of those people that didn’t want a pit in fear that my grandson might play to much and do something that the Pitt reacts badly to him, has not happened and pray that it doesn’t.

    Reply
  21. “As far as other pets go, the Labrador side might do OK with them, but if he inherits from the Pit Bull, you can expect a lot of aggressiveness towards other dogs of same sex, and towards other types of pets. If you do own other dogs or cats, a Labrabull mix might not be a good idea, at least if it’s an unknown quantity as far as temperament is concerned.”
    First of all this is a totally biased and untrue statement about the pitbull breed. I own two Labrabulls, an American Pitbull terrier, and an English Chocolate Labrador. Not one of my pitties shows aggression towards other dogs, regardless of it’s sex. Because a Pitbull is a terrier it has a high prey drive and will likely give chase to small animals, but that does not mean it is an aggressive breed. And Lastly, please quit spreading falsehoods about an already misunderstood and disenfranchised breed of dog. These dogs are not aggressive! People who breed for the trait, neglect, abuse, and mistreat these dogs are why they have gotten tagged as aggressive animals. The Golden retriever is the number biter of humans hands down but that isn’t very news worthy and doesn’t generate the ratings the media hopes for. Please, Please, Please stop the discrimination against the Bully breeds!

    Reply
  22. We are happily adopted by Diesel – who looks like a black and white spotted pitbull. He has the most loving nature, and will take every opportunity to let you know he loves you madly. He has had us now for exactly two weeks! He acts as if he has been with us for all of his two years of life. We found him on Craigslist – and one look at his adorable face, we knew Diesel would be perfect for us. We were previously owned by a Psychotic Parson’s Russell Terrorist – we were crazy about him, slashing teeth and all (do not go for their toys or food), poor baby died of a horrible brain tumor. We thought we would never get another dog. But Diesel won us over immediately! He is very aware of our water bottle when he tries to test us with sheer naughtiness (he will be neutered at the end of the month), and is a very good sport. We all love each other . . .

    Reply
  23. Hi my name is April. Would love one of these fine beauty’s to grow with my children… If anyone has any pups available now or before Christmas please call me, 8142321877…
    Fixed income but will defiantly find the money if needed.

    Reply
    • Hello I know this response is a little late (roughly a year) I am currently having Labrabulls from my blue nose American terrier (pit-bull terrier) If you are interested still feel free to call me. She is due in January around the 15th. We will be taking care of the pups until they are done with mommas care. They will be treated with the proper initial shots. I am going to hold off on the spading/neutering for now but if requested , we will take care of this as well. My name is Bo my number is 505-803-2621 or my email is [email protected] feel free to reach out to me and we can work everything out. Anyone is welcome to contact me. However, I can only provide the dogs that I have I do not plan on breeding this girl again. Thank You!

      Reply
  24. I have a labra bull she’s a rescue dog about a year old. Been very easy to train and gets along great with my boys and my neighbor’s cat. She seems to have allergies, without doing a test; too expensive, the doctor thinks it food allergies. So we’ve changed her food to salmon and potatoes by Blue’s which is quite expensive but she is worth it. My question is does anyone else have problems with their dog breaking out in red itchy blotches? My doctor put her on antibiotics and allergy meds which has helped but she still is red blotchy inside her legs mostly upfront. Doesn’t scratch as much but does bite/lick her feet occasionally. Has anyone come across this problem with their labra bull??

    Reply
    • I must admit: I used to raise Labs – and we had MANY litters. After many years and they passed on, my wife and I tried great danes and I got rid of them because they became aggressive. We found a litter that was going to be put down and I found a love bug we call happy – he’s a labra bull. He is 3 now and yes – we paid for the allergy tests. We live in Florida and of course, he’s allergic to everything, and since things blossom year round, he is always in distress. A betadine wash on his feet after a walk helped 99% of the time but I got tired of doing that. He is on a regiment apoquil and rymadyl daily which takes care of 99% of this issues. If he walks on grass thats been recently treated, I may have to pull him from rymadyl and give him temaril-p for a few days and it clears right up. Other than that, I have to protect him from all animals as he simply wants to roll on his back and be exposed. We have a cat and he gets along with all animals, absolutely LOVES kids, and likes attention from all people. He has been through 2 AKC classes for beginner and advanced as a working dog (and passed!!) and luckily, has no aggressive bone in his body. That said, I have run into many places who give me the “He looks like a pit” so they wont day care him – even after allowing him in for 8 hrs where he got a perfect report card. THEIR LOSS!! Many have told me he is the ambassador for the breed because he is so friendly and knows so many things. Hates going outside, loves to snuggle. Loves to have his teeth flossed and brushed nightly, gets the sunday paper, sit, stay, lay, rollover – does a kiss when asked and even impersonates elvis (with the lip going up) when asked. For what I pay for his medicine, you can tell , I wouldn’t trade him for anything…..

      Reply
  25. Hello, I have a 13 yr old lab/boxer mix. I recently got lab/pit Mix puppy. They both are males upon initial meeting the pup was not interested in being friends, now they get along very well. I see the difference in both dogs personality. Most dogs require the same thing, guidence,love and attention. I think the first writer was pretty accurate so for. Even then my oldest dog very protective of the family and kids, the pup has a good teacher. Overall I enjoyed my first lab/Mix so I stuck with what breed I know best. I had pit bulls and chows growing up. I think I like these Mix breeds better. Don’t judge just my opinion.

    Reply
  26. Paula 06/13/17

    I have a lab/pit bull mix that I adopted from our local shelter when she was 4 months old. She is now 10 months and is so very sweet and so far is submissive around other dogs and people. She has bonded with my 3 year old female Minature Pincsher and my cat. I guess I got lucky. They are both very high energy dogs and are entertaining to watch them play. This dog is so grateful to be rescued out of the shelter. She literally climbs in my lap and hugs me every morning.

    Reply
  27. A dogs aggression can come from the hardwiring of the breed. However, it has been proven that the main source of a dogs behaviors is in direct association with the training, time, and treatment the owner contributes to their pet. Children and pets learn from their parents via verbal, hands-on and vicarious learning. Educate yourself, dedicate the time, and apply your learnings to your pet consistently and it is very unlikely that the pet will be unruly.

    Reply
    • I have a 1 year old lab/pitbull mix, and his name is DaVinci. His mom black lab and dad dark brown pitbull. Mom was really protective but I met her during puppy times, and the dad looked really scary and mean but just a big teddy bear, dumb as hell but really sweet. My puppy started walking first and followed his dad around I found him 6wks old underneath the air conditioning upside down drinking the dripped ice cold water in the 100 degree weather with his dad, so I picked him lol he is blonde and white and yellow eyes. He is the smartest dog I’ve ever had! He was hard at first cuz I worked a lot and him and the Yorkie stayed inside alone in the apartment. He ate my couch, the floor he pulled the entire floor up. But he only did that when I was gone too long or didn’t come home for lunch to see him. After I moved he became the best dog ever. He had his own yard fenced in, and did well in my room on cold days. Potty trained fast, he walks without a leash since he was tiny and he is rambunctious but because he shows his love very exciting like haha. He uses a leash now, excersis , sleeps with me in bed like a baby puppy but an 80 lb boy. I fixed him soon as I could and that helped with the territory marking not completely but not everywhere like he was, he would spray on the coffee table and just out of the blue in front of me, and actually sprayed my jacket one day. So I went through a lot with him because of the living situation and stuff so I don’t blame him, but if your committed to this type of breed they will return the favor 10 times for you. They love to make you happy, and loyal as ever , which becomes very protective and jealous so o had to watch out for my Yorkie , he wouldn’t ever snap at her but more like try and push her from hugging me or show his size sometimes but he and her and the closest ever now, he watches over her in the back yard and his bark his the loudest on the block nobody’s dog is louder but he only barks when necessary,. Mail man, or ppl walking by, he doesn’t care about other dogs barking, or sirens, or ppl talking, only if he gets scared, or a car horn goes off haha it’s funny. The best dog ever, and every bit of play time he loves to show off, and he also loves to cuddle. If I am laying down on the floor he will back up as close as possible to me and lay next to me with his head on my back or legs or his paw on me so he knows where I’m at at all times. When he wakes and has to pee he lays at the bed until he can’t anymore then walks over to the bed and licks my ear then does the ear and the head and if I’m not awake he licks my whole face and pushed me up with his head to tell me get my ass up I need outside and I’m hungry haha…I could go on and on but hope that helps to know they are worth every penny every bad moment every day until they learn every bit of love. Best dogs ever

      Reply
  28. I have a rescue that I assume is a labrabull. He’s a delight. He’s easy to train, loves everyone and everything. Great with kids, happy and playful at the dog park and has shown no aggression. He’s my first dog and I feel so lucky! Definitely has a prey drive but never to an extreme. With lots of exercise and play time (he does need a lot) he’s the perfect pup!

    Reply

Leave a Comment